Morning Thanks

Garrison Keillor once said we'd all be better off if we all started the day by giving thanks for just one thing. I'll try.

Wednesday, June 05, 2013

Morning Thanks--the sun



By the time my wife came home last night, it was foggy, she said. All day long, the dreary sky hung over us like yet another bad dream. When I sweep up the water in the basement--it's a not even a quarter-inch deep--it simply returns, so our sump pump has been running for a week now.  There's nothing down there, but a swamp is depressing.

I haven't checked the gauge--I don't need more bad news--but I'd guess we got another inch or more, all tolled, yesterday.  There was no wind, so at least you didn't have to walk like a drunk; but there was simply more of the morose in the skies over Siouxland. For me at least, remembering last year's drought is like trying to remember Gettysburg or Waterloo--I can't; I wasn't there.  Since February, we've been blessed with remarkable weather, remarkably bad weather.

So when, sometime after eight last night, the blessed sun made a brief appearance on stage, I grabbed an old camera and roamed the neighborhood, glorying in every last slash of sunlight I could get in my viewfinder.  That picture up above is no masterpiece, but see the way that prairie grass is lit? See that muddy cloud breaking up back there?  For a half hour maybe, hope was renewed.  Honestly, it's beautiful.

Or this. It's a dead tree.


I don't care what anybody says--in a bath of gold, it's breathtaking.  

For a while at least, things were breaking up and there was real promise.  Hallelujah.


It's too dark outside my patio door right now to see anything at all, but weather.com claims we're going to be clear and cool, clear and cool today.  Well, I got news, after all this rain and unending dreary skies, clear is cool, no matter what the temp.  We'll take it.

Two weeks ago, we took a bet on fertile Iowa soil and put in some tomato plants where there'd never been a vegetable before.  Those plants are a sickly family dressed as they are in their faint green, and I don't think they've grown an inch.  No sun.

Today, we're promised reprieve.  Today, my morning thanks ascend in a sky where I hope there's infinite room for the sun.  This morning I'm thankful even for the promise of sun.

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

Psalm 143
by James Vanden Bosh
Make haste,O Lord and give your answer.
My spirit fails; do not forsake me,
or I will be like those who die.
Let morn-ing bring your lov-ing kind-ness,
for I have put my trust in you.

Anonymous said...

Last summer I had Angus to feed and no grass... it was to hot to grow pasture grass and I had to feed them bold bales. Now, because of the abundant rain, my Angus have abundant grass... I refuse to complain.

Enjoy the rain....

Anonymous said...

Last summer I had Angus to feed and no grass... it was to hot too grow pasture grass and I had to feed them old bales. Now, because of the abundant rain, my Angus have abundant grass... I refuse to complain.

Enjoy the rain....

Anonymous said...

Like Ezekial, Jim saw the glory of the Lord rise from the east and enter the doors of his tomato plants. In Ezekial's case, it was the east door to the temple.

Anonymous said...

It's called CO2 addiction. Global Warming = Climate Change = too hot and too cold, too dry and too wet. Are we all a bunch of CO2 addicts? Ready to sober up yet? Where I live our annual rain fall is still 1.75 inches. It's not even green out here. Seems you have more moisture in your basement during the past several days than we have had all year. But our Son still shines.

Anonymous said...

From reading the posts on CO2 you would think that Global Warming was or caused the Original Sin.

Hey dude, you need a new topic....

Anonymous said...

You got it right Dude! Remember the Garden of Eden? God said take care of this garden. But don't mess with a few rules I have for you. (Leave the CO2 underground where I put it.) But no, we know how to play "God"! Now we humans have CO2 at 400ppm. Last time that happened was way before the Garden of Eden. Check it out.

Anonymous said...

The oil became oil after the flood. The trees and foliage got buried underground and made oil and coal etc. long after the Garden of Eden.

Like a said, you better find a new topic...you got your timeline all goofed up...